“A lot of the challenges I run into are a level of political disengagement in engineering”

I am so grateful for the write up about my research and activism done by Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at Oregon State University.

Andrea Haverkamp is a PhD candidate in Environmental Engineering, with a minor in Queer Studies at Oregon State University. Her work is in engineering education, which explores the student and faculty experiences in engineering, right from curriculum to learning practices and pedagogy and also looks at diversity, inclusion and equity in the classroom.

Haverkamp is also President of the Coalition of Graduate employees (CGE), representing over 1800 graduate employees at OSU, “I think labor union activism is a critical action-oriented feminist praxis,” she says.

Read the article here, or click through for the text below.

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KMUZ Labor Report with Andrea Haverkamp of the Coalition of Graduate Employees at OSU

I recently spoke on KMUZ Community Radio in Salem, Oregon about how labor unions are fighting for reform in higher education and how this connects to creating a just, equitable, and socially minded campus community.

Adapted excerpt after the jump – check the link here:
KMUZ Willamette Wakeup Labor Report with Andrea Haverkamp

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Boots Riley On Power, Art, and the Radical Dr. King

Audio of the event – Click Here

Transcript February 2, 2020

Laborwave Radio presents a reproduction of audio from a live discussion between Boots Riley and Andrea Haverkamp. The event was organized by the Coalition of Graduate Employees (CGE 6069) and King Legacy Advisory Board (KLAB) to honor the legacy of the radical Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr and the 20th Anniversary of CGE.

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Feminist Killjoy with Andrea Haverkamp

Branching Out

Welcome to our debut episode of Branching Out! This week, I talked to Andrea Haverkamp about gender dynamics in engineering. Listen to the audio from this episode HERE!

You can find Andrea at:SJ Engineers. The sources we reference in this episode are:

Follow us on Twitter @branchoutpod!

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Advancing Nonbinary & Transgender Engineering Students at SWE Hawaiian Islands

I am so happy to share the full video and my slides from the May 25th 2019 SWE Hawaiian Islands event titled “More Work To Do in STEM for Diversity and Inclusion – A Conversation on Underrepresented Genders.” The event was so wonderful and opened up space to discuss Māhū gender in Native Hawaiian culture, (de)colonization and gender activism, trans & nonbinary experiences and identities, and where organizations such as the Society of Women Engineers can go to advance inclusion and support.

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Overlooked Diversity – Religion, Faith, & Spirituality

The following is a post I wrote for the Graduate Society of Women Engineers blog – check out the original post here.

When we discuss the many identities we carry in our lives, the most commonly listed are often race/ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and disability status. When we discuss diversity and inclusion, our efforts often center on one of, if not the intersection of, these identities. However, one core identity for many of us has seemed to slip through our collective radar – religion and spirituality. “In an era when colleges are expanding their engagement of diversity issues, and at a time when religion plays a central role in public life and global affairs, religion continues to be the dimension of diversity that many institutions leave out.” This is a central claim in Eboo Patel’s article “Faith Is The Diversity Issue Ignored by College Campuses” published in The Chronicle of Higher Education in October 2018. In the article, she discusses the possibilities and needs on campuses to recognize this difference. Additionally, she asserts that efforts for religious inclusivity on campus are underfunded, if funded at all. She writes about the transformative possibilities of having interfaith dialogues and unpacking stereotypes and prejudices. As soon as I read this it seemed to immediately ‘click’ – and I’ve become pretty passionate about the subject. Eboo Patel is right – religious diversity is often left out. Why should we start paying attention to this?

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Tips for Men on how to be Allies to Women in Engineering

This is a blog post myself and Rachel Tenney wrote for the Graduate Society of Women  Engineers blog. Check out the original post here.

Engineering is a male dominated field. There’s really no dispute about that. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, just 15.9% of employed engineering and architectural professionals are women. SWE and GradSWE are open to people of all genders – this includes men. Men, being in the majority, can play arguably an extremely important role in making engineering a discipline which is inclusive, welcoming, and celebrating of women and other underrepresented genders. Today, nearly 50% of women in engineering will experience sexual harassment by male peers – it will take male allies to bring this number to 0%.

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